Archive for the ‘sports’ Tag

4 STEPS TO NAVY SEAL SUCCESS   Leave a comment

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Navy SEAL Larry Fowler recently authored an article at navyseal.com listing four steps to being successful in life, based upon his experience as a successful graduate of Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training. The brief list is:

1. Have a plan. Be prepared.
2. Never panic, and never quit.
3. Accept “the only easy day was yesterday” attitude.
4. Be fiercely loyal — no excuses.

Fowler explains each of these steps and provides examples in the article. You can read the full article HERE.

7 SECRET HABITS OF NAVY SEALS (BRENT GLEESON)   Leave a comment

140121-N-KB563-148Navy SEAL Brent Gleeson recently authored an article published at Inc. on seven habits practiced by Navy SEALs. The brief list of these seven habits is:

1. Be loyal.
2. Put others before yourself.
3. Be reflective.
4. Be obsessively organized.
5. Assume you don’t know enough.
6. Be detail-oriented.
7. Never get comfortable.

Gleeson provides explanations of each of these habits. You can read the full article HERE.

TALKING TO YOUR DAUGHTER (OR ANYBODY) ABOUT FITNESS   2 comments


Excellent article by Brynn Harrington on how to talk to your daughter about fitness. It is important to instill a healthy attitude toward fitness as soon as possible in child development, and to keep that value nurtured throughout their growth. For girls, it is especially important as society pressures them to value the number on a weight scale over their time on the mile, maximum reps numbers, and other numbers that tell them they are capable! That said, her main points are good for talking to ANYONE about fitness! Her main points are:

1.Strength equals self-sufficiency.
2.Fitness opens doors.
3.The bike is the new golf course.
4.Exercise is a lifestyle, not an event.
5.Health begets health.
6.Endorphins help you cope.
7.Working out signals hard-working.
8.If you feel beautiful, you look beautiful.
9.Nature rules.
10.Little eyes are always watching.

You can read the full article HERE!

DELANEY’S DAILY P.T. – JUNE 4, 2013   Leave a comment

RIP 60Getting back into suspension training over lunchtime at work, and setting up routines that will last me for the next couple of months. Here’s the program for today:

1200 Outdoor Suspension Training
1. Row & Rear Delt Fly 4×8
2. Triceps Extension & Fly 4×8
3. Rhomboid Pull & Bicep Curl 4×8
4. Swimmer’s Crawl & Mountain Climbers 4×8

1500 Perfect Push-ups
1. Regular 4×4
2. Wide 4×4
3. Narrow 4×4
4. Regular 4×4

1915 Stairs (30 mins.)

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #9 – ROBERT NEEDHAM (NAVY SEAL) ON TEAM LEADERSHIP   Leave a comment

Today I would like to continue sharing with you more of my highlights and notes from Team Secrets of the Navy SEALs by Robert Needham (Navy SEAL).

Chapter 1 – Leading the Best (cont.)

1. “If an individual or a Team starts to lose focus, they must step back and review.” — Sometimes individuals or teams feel that they do not have time to step back and refocus. Of course, if you ask if they have more or less time to lose focus, go for a walk in the woods, fail and get miserable, re-focus time doesn’t look as costly as the alternative. That said, I’ve seen people and teams get into “locked up” mode and require a wake-up call to snap out of it.

2. “It is incumbent upon any group that desires true success to set an environment that allows and encourages communication.” I used to pride myself on being a submarine commander when it comes to communication: “If you don’t hear from me, everything is OK.” With time, I have really come to think that all things are possible with good communication. Just the social support provided in communicatin improves the resilience and chances of survival and success of people in tough situations. As I have heard so often said (to me) before: “Communicate, communicate, communicate.”

3. “You must honestly evaluate your own ability and communicate forthrightly about it — for your own good and for that of the Team. If everyone else is unaware of a weak link, they cannot repair it. Unnoticed, the weak link will break, costing money, time, and perhaps even lives.” — Thee’s a strategy called “Fake it ’til you make it!” for self-improvement, which involves acting like the person you want to be in order to become that person. It’s an effective approach. At the same time, trying to “fake out” others by posing or lying about knowledge or ability is misguided and a clear commitment to making disaster happen for self and others. The bigger person on a Team knows to be clear about limits, risks, and look for reality-checks and options from others.

4. “Wat’s important to the SEAL TEAm is important to any team of professionals inbusiness: Stay informed, stay alert, and stay alive.” — Yep!

5. “It is imperative that you stress [to your team] that no issue will be addressed unless the author also includes a viable solution.” — Major General Ronald Bailey (USMC) imposes the same requirement onhis team. You don’t get to complain or bring up a problem without a number of possible solutions. This makes sense if you want to see firsthand descriptions of problems always accompanied by firsthand proposals for solutions. If you’re not there, you really end up counting on the person who is closest to the problem to ascertain a best probable solution. Makes sense!

6. “Challenge yur team to think outside the box, brainstorm, and create. Give them the responsibility and the latitude to be creative.” — Innovation, adaptation and improvement require creativity. It is an invaluable resource asset for any team. Take care of it!

7. “If you can find humor in a bad situation and joke about it, you will have a better chance of salvaging your attitude and coming out on top.” — Humor puts things in perspective, and opens up space for creative thinking and problem-solving. In addition, laughter activates physiological processes that reduce stress and the distracting, demoralizing and fatiguing effects of stress. Use humor like a medicine and a weapon!

I am preparing engaging leadership development modules, including practical exercises, for individuals and teams. If you or your team is interested in engaging with leadership development in a practical and meaningful work session, let me – Tom Delaney – know via e-mail to greatriverfitness@gmail.com. We’ll put it together and make it happen!

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #8: KNOW WHEN TO MOVE ON!   Leave a comment

The Marine Corps’ 237th Birthday is coming up. I am not a Marine, but I sure have learned a lot from being around Marines. A life experience I especially value was being at Marine Corps Recruit Depot – San Diego one day and hearing Major General Ronald Bailey (USMC) explain that in all matters brought to him, he allows a maximum of 30 seconds for complaining, or as he termed it “pissed-ness.” At the expiration of 30 seconds, it’s time to recommit and move on. No exceptions, and if that’s not possible for someone, they’re off the team. Honor, Courage, and Commitment are the core values, and fidelity to these values is not optional for anyone on the team.

For me, the self-check concerns whether or not I get hung up and linger on my anger over some frustration, or do I recognize that my core values are more important than my feelings, and compell me to recommit to my core values, recommit to my team (even if my problem is with one of my teammates), and move on with work and life. Am I helping get the work done and the values realized, or am I still “back there” not helping myself or anyone else, and more importantly, not living my core values? If I’m still “back there,” it’s time to look in the mirror, look at a bronze coin, look at the sky – whatever it takes – and get back up and running with the team and with my core values.

Train hard, never quit, live well!

Tom Delaney
Founder & Trainer
Great River Fitness

STEW SMITH SAYS DO PUSH-UPS & PULL-UPS EVERY OTHER DAY   Leave a comment

Stew Smith (Navy SEAL) is an informative authority on physical fitness preparation for special operations assessment and selection (e.g. the Physical Screening Test for BUD/S selection). Recently, Smith published an article to reiterate his view that push-ups and pull-ups require a minimum 24-hour recovery period similiar to any resistance training.

This is not breaking news for the field of physical training as it has been understood for a while that 24-hour recovery periods work well in general, and therefore there are advantages in daily training programs to alternating upper body workout days with lower body workout days. For example, Paul Roarke (USMC Ret.) incorporates the alternating days approach in his Enhanced Physical Readiness System. That all said, many people preparing for special operations selection continue to perform push-ups and pull-ups on a daily basis because they understand it as a rapid way to increase their maximimum capacity for repetitions, and/or because they understand that push-ups and pull-ups will be required of them on a daily basis in the spec ops training program to which they are applying. The Navy Special Warfare PT Guide currently prescribes four days a week of pull-ups combined with push-ups, with three of those days in a row. The problem is that there is a point of diminishing returns with this approach, where gains will cease and decreases may even be observed.

One thing I am interested in is whether there may in fact be advantages to doing push-up and pull-up type calisthenics every day in the same way that there has been suggested benefits of running every day, alternating high effort run days with lighter recovery run days. In my current program for example, I alternate focused intense upper body workout days with other days with relatively lighter suspension strap training (e.g. jumping squats and lunges). It seems to be working for me, and I have the data to show it. That said, can I really narrow it down to the single explanation of how upper body workouts happen on alternate days in my program? Maybe not. But at this point, progress is progress and I am not going to fix something that isn’t broken.

You can read Stew Smith’s (Navy SEAL) full article HERE.

If you or your team want to develop a customized physical fitness assessment and improvement program that is effective, affordable and sustainable, contact me – Tom Delaney – at greatriverfitness@gmail.com. It’s what I do and my work motivates me every day! You will be just as motivated too!

USE YOUR “BODY CLOCK” TO DO YOUR BEST WORK!   1 comment

Your body, and especially your brain, have a built in clock and daily rhythm of activity. It’s called your circadian rhythm. There are times of high activity and low activity. Tracking these ties can help you do your best at a task by doing it when your body is most capable of thattask. In the worse scenario, when you need to do a task at the time when your body (and especially your brain) is least up for doing it, you know what you’re up against and can take precautionary measures or get some additional support.

A recent article in the Wallstreet Journal by Sue Shellenbarger reviewed some circadian rhythm research, and I want to share my highlights and notes with you:

1. “Disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to such problems as diabetes, depression, dementia and obesity, says Steve Kay, a professor of molecular and computational biology at the University of Southern California.” — This tells me that paying attention to circadian rhythms is an important part of any physical fitness plan. I knew it before, but this statement reinforces the priority.

2. “When it comes to doing cognitive work, for example, most adults perform best in the late morning, says Dr. Kay.” — If I need to hit something hard cognitively, and have the choice as to when, it may be best to schedule it for the morning rather than afternoon or evening.

3. “Most people are more easily distracted from noon to 4 p.m., according to recent research led by Robert Matchock, an associate professor of psychology at Pennsylvania State University.” — If I need to do a task that requires sustained attention, the afternoon might beb a time best avoided.

4. “Alertness tends to slump after eating a meal, Dr. Matchock found. Sleepiness also tends to peak around 2 p.m., making that a good time for a nap, says Martin Moore-Ede, chairman and chief executive of Circadian, a Stoneham, Mass., training and consulting firm.” — OK, more indications that the afternoon is not the best time for attentive thinking. I get the idea! 😉

5. “For most adults, problems that require open-ended thinking are often best tackled in the evening when they are tired, according to a 2011 study in the journal Thinking & Reasoning.” — Evening might be a good time for creative thinking.

6. “Of course, everyone’s body clock isn’t the same, making it even harder to synchronize natural rhythms with daily plans. ” — I have experienced this! Just because I am a “morning person” doesn’t mean anyone else is, and those that aren’t sure do let you know!

7. “Morning people tend to wake up and go to sleep earlier and to be most productive early in the day. Evening people tend to wake up later, start more slowly and peak in the evening.”– Sure, but which one is a better dancer? (lol)

8. “Physical performance is usually best, and the risk of injury least, from about 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., says Michael Smolensky, an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Texas, Austin, and lead author with Lynne Lamberg of “The Body Clock Guide to Better Health.” — This tells me there might be advantages to working out immediately after work, which is something I currently do on Fridays, and around that same time on Saturdays as well.

9. “Muscle strength tends to peak between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. at levels as much as 6% above the day’s lows…” — See #8.

10. “Another boost for physical strength comes from the lungs, which function 17.6% more efficiently at 5 p.m. than at midday…” — See #8 above. Maybe 8 through 10 have to do with chasing down dinner!

11. “Eye-hand coordination is best in late afternoon…joints and muscles are as much as 20% more flexible in the evening, lowering the risk of injury, Dr. Smolensky says.”

12. “These body rhythms hold true regardless of how much you’ve slept or how recently you’ve eaten.” — That’s interesting to me. These rhythms are what I call “hard-wired.”

You can check out the full article HERE.

POST-WORKOUT NUTRITION   1 comment

What is the optimal nutritive intake after a workout, and when exactly is the best time to get it into your system? I have been following the research that suggests there is a one-hour window after a workout, during which time my body is aggressively seeking simple proteins to repair and grow muscle tissue. Milk and whey protein are supposed to be good sources, which is why yesterday afternoon you may have seen me wandering the Barnes and Noble “Fitness” aisle drinking from an open gallon container of chocolate milk. Sure, a quart or smaller container would have been less obtrusive, but when I tell you that the gallon of low-fat milk was cheaper than the smaller containers of milk at Cub Foods, and when you know that when it comes to health and fitness I don’t care about appearances, you will understand where I was coming from. Subsequent to working out after work, my only goal was to get protein into my body ASAP, even if it meant looking a little socially maladjusted (again).

Anyway, Mike Roussell posted a good article for Live Strong that provides a very good brief summary of workout nutrition. Here are my highlights:

1. “The workout nutrition window begins 20 to 30 minutes before you exercise and lasts for one to two hours after the workout.”

2. Workout nutrition myths:
a. Don’t eat after you workout.
b. Post workout nutrition is all that matters.
c. Carbohydrates are the most important nutrient to get during and after you exercise.

3. Key steps for nutrition maximization:
a. Start sipping on your workout shake 20 minutes before exercise.
b. Continue to sip on your workout shake as you train.
c. Then finish off your workout shake when you complete your workout; and if muscle growth is your goal, have another one immediately.
d. Finally, workout nutrition “meals” should be liquid.

You can check out the full article HERE.

MOTIVATIONAL MOMENT #4: JONATHAN SIEGRIST CLIMBING   Leave a comment

Hang with Jonathan Siegrist in this incredible climbing vid. If liberal wisecracks from Naropa University alumni bother you, have a kale chip and refocus on the unflinching commitment this guy brings to scaling the vertical! Besides, look at me…that’s right I’m a Macalester College alumnus with more clock hours on the meditation cushion than a commercial airline pilot, an impressive Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan record collection, several ethnic shirts — and I can still qualify for a security clearance! Always challenge your mind! Anyway…this guy has skills and hardcore commitment, check it out dude!