Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

DELANEY’S DAILY P.T. – NOVEMBER 21, 2013   Leave a comment

Trail Run MorningWell, it’s time to fire up the GRF page again! It’s snowing here today, so the outdoor training scene is beginning to evolve toward winter. That said, t he temperatures here have been very accomodating, ranging from the upper 30’s to mid 40’s — sultry weather for Minnesota this time of year! OK, here’s what I got done today:

0615
3-mile trail and hill run (Brickyard Trail, Lilydale Regional Park)

1200
Note: Had to squeeze in a fast workout at work over lunch because tonight I’m booked up. So…
Parabody ST950 Exercise Machine Session
a. Cable Biceps Curls (50 lbs): 3×5
b. Cable Upright Rows (40 lbs): 3×4
c. Cable Reverse Biceps Curls (30 lbs): 3×4
d. Sitting Cable Pulls (100 lbs): 3×5
e. Cable Bench Press (100 lbs): 3×5
f. Regular Perfect Push-ups: 3,1
g. Wide Perfect Push-ups: 2,1
h. Narrow Perfect Push-ups: 1,1
i. Regular Perfect-Push-ups: 3,2,1

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LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #8: KNOW WHEN TO MOVE ON!   Leave a comment

The Marine Corps’ 237th Birthday is coming up. I am not a Marine, but I sure have learned a lot from being around Marines. A life experience I especially value was being at Marine Corps Recruit Depot – San Diego one day and hearing Major General Ronald Bailey (USMC) explain that in all matters brought to him, he allows a maximum of 30 seconds for complaining, or as he termed it “pissed-ness.” At the expiration of 30 seconds, it’s time to recommit and move on. No exceptions, and if that’s not possible for someone, they’re off the team. Honor, Courage, and Commitment are the core values, and fidelity to these values is not optional for anyone on the team.

For me, the self-check concerns whether or not I get hung up and linger on my anger over some frustration, or do I recognize that my core values are more important than my feelings, and compell me to recommit to my core values, recommit to my team (even if my problem is with one of my teammates), and move on with work and life. Am I helping get the work done and the values realized, or am I still “back there” not helping myself or anyone else, and more importantly, not living my core values? If I’m still “back there,” it’s time to look in the mirror, look at a bronze coin, look at the sky – whatever it takes – and get back up and running with the team and with my core values.

Train hard, never quit, live well!

Tom Delaney
Founder & Trainer
Great River Fitness

AIR FORCE PARARESCUE JUMPER RECRUITING VIDEO   Leave a comment

USAF Special Operations Recruiting released a highly motivating video on Pararescue Jumper training! Watch at your own risk! If you start standing on your chair at work and doing jump, drop and rolls, wear a helmet! 😉

ROPE COIL & CARRY   Leave a comment

Knot tying is an important skill for everything from outdoor sports and spec ops to moving grandma’s mattress on the roof of your car. One of my personal goals is to revisit and improve my knot tying skills by reviewing the examples in Basic Seamanship, which you can also review HERE. ITS Tactical has been running a very good “Knot of the Week” series for a couple of years and this week’s feature covers how to coil and carry rope for climbing or rappelling.

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #5: “SOMETHING BIGGER THAN MYSELF”   Leave a comment

“I want to serve something bigger than myself,” is a phrase you will hear from people as the reason why they chose a commitment of service to others and to the nation, even when and especially when that choice involves sacrfice and acceptance of personal risk. I heard this phrase from Marines in the Assault Amphibious School Battalion (MCRD – San Diego) as the reason why they chose the Marine Corps. Robert Needham (Navy SEAL) describes commitment to a cause larger than self as a defining characteristic of SEAL Team members. The conception of a cause bigger than myself, and the determination of a conscious resolve to that cause, and the commitment to take direction in my life from that cause, is an important aspect of leadership development.

My experience in working with people has been that this kind of resolve and commitment is often not easy to arrive at. Two obstacles can happen. First, is the personal statement “I don’t believe things like higher causes and things bigger than myself are real.” Second is the personal statement on the other side, “I believe in things like higher causes and things bigger than myself, but I’m not important or cut out for that stuff.”

The first person is a risky person to have on a team because when things are at their absolute worst and only a belief in a higher cause will compel that person to do what they need to do for the team, that person cannot be counted on to come through for the team because they do not feel compelled by the cause. However, I don’t write off people like that. I invite people like that to get an open mind and experiment with the idea that there are higher causes and things bigger than him or her. Try it out and see how it works for you and others. “I don’t believe in something bigger than myself, but if i did, I guess I would …” OK, that’s a start! My experience has been that a lot of people will start out reluctant but will come around after experiencing life with a belief in a higher cause and something bigger than her or him. All of the sudden life has more meaning, and the person has a more noble identity and higher esteem for self and from others. It positively creates an aura and palpable energy around the person! Some people call this process “drinking the kool-aid” in reference to a cult tragedy back in the 70’s…but in this case we’re talking about drinking something that reveals and empowers.

The second person is also risky to have one a team because when things are at their absolute worst and only a belief in a higher cause will compel that person to do what they need to do for the team they will not feel they are the “chosen one” or up to the job. Like the first person, I don’t write off these people either. The problem is that this person has a preconceived notion about what a champion or hero looks like and has decided they don’t fit the bill, or grew up with people telling her or him that they don’t have the stuff of courage and heroism in them. This is of course negative self-talk and literally not true anyway. Peruse photos and biographies of heroes and you’ll see that they come in all shapes, sizes, races, backgrounds, etc. There are the big and burly classic looking heroes, and there are just as many wiry looking bad asses out there as well. Body type, gender, race — none of that selects the solid teammate or hero. Fateful matches between hard circumstance and even harder personal commitment makes heroism happen. Right away I think of Dick Couch writing how it isn’t the big burly guys who make it through BUD/S reliably. Watch the true story of Carl Brashear in the film Men of Honor, an African-American who rose out of poverty and racism to become a hero. Look at photos and read about the Night Witches of the 46th Taman Guards Night Bomber Aviation Regiment who flew decrepit biplanes against the German Army in World War II. There are many examples and it all goes to show that there is no formulaic hero or champion — it’s only about personal commitment and the brains to follow through on it. So to any person who thinks they’re too small for something bigger than him or herself, I invite that type of person to start dismantling their preconceived notions of what the higher cause and the hero looks like. They need to start looking into the mirror and considering the possibility that there’s a champion and a hero looking back at them, if they just commit to it being so.

OK, so that’s plenty of advice on how to work with people in either of those two circumstances. Where did it come from? It comes from my own personal experience of having been both of those people. Days when I didn’t have time for higher causes and things bigger than myself. Days when I thought “I’m too skinny” and then days when I thought “I’m too fat” to be of any use to a higher cause. Been there, done that. Worked through it all and now I stand on the other end and can give anyone the facts. All of this is to say that the best advice for others is once again usually the best advice for myself as well, and to never lose track of that. I can’t just state an example for others to follow, I gotta live it.

If you or your team want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with this aspect of leadership development, let me – Tom Delaney – know by sending an e-mail to greatriverfitness@gmail.com, and I will be able to share with you workshop formats and complete a planning process with you. We’ll make it happen!

Tran hard, never quit, live well!

Tom Delaney

2013 GRAND TO GRAND ULTRA VIDEO   Leave a comment

A new promotional video for the Grand to Grand Ultra (G2G) race has been released. This looks like an awesome race across 160 miles of incredible wilderness. Check it out!

Posted September 8, 2012 by Tom & Nicki Delaney in Uncategorized

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #2 (GRTFC LEADERSHIP SERIES)   1 comment

The Center for Complex Operations within the National Defense University (Washington DC) publicized U.S. Army Doctrine 2015 today. The Mission Command Center of Excellence at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center states “Doctrine 2015 captures the essential lessons learned from 10+ years of persistent conflict,” and has made the series of Army Doctrine Publications (ADP’s) publicly available and accessible HERE. One of these is ADP 7-0, Training Units and Developing Leaders. I consistently find lessons in reviewing theoretical and applied leadership models, and reviewing ADP 7-0 was no exception. Here are a few key points on leadership development that I took away from looking at ADP 7-0:

1. “Self-development is as important as institutional training and operational assignments. Self-development is a personal responsibility. Self-development enhances qualifications for a current position or helps prepare an individual for future positions. Individuals are responsible for their own professional growth and for seeking out self-development opportunities. Soldiers and civilians sustain their individual strengths and address gaps in their skills and knowledge. However, for self-development to be effective, all Soldiers and civilians must be completely honest with themselves to understand both personal strengths and gaps in skills, knowledge, and behaviors—and then take the appropriate, continuing steps to enhance their capabilities.”

2. “The self-development training domain is planned, goal-oriented learning that reinforces and expands the depth and breadth of an individual’s knowledge base, self-awareness, and situational awareness; complements institutional and operational learning; enhances professional competence; and meets personal objectives. Within this domain, Army leaders expect Soldiers and Army civilians to fill in their skills, knowledge, and behavior gaps from institutional training and operational assignments.”

3. “Effective leaders understand that change is inevitable in any operational environment. The time to react to change can be short. Adaptability comes from training under complex, changing conditions, with minimal information available to make decisions.”

4. “Training prepares units and individuals to be resilient. Training must prepare units and Soldiers for the stress of operations. Unit training plans must incorporate programs that improve individual and collective mental and physical fitness.”

5. Principles of Leader Development
– Lead by example.
– Develop subordinate leaders.
– Create a learning environment for subordinate leaders.
– Train leaders in the art and science of mission command.
– Train to develop adaptive leaders.
– Train leaders to think critically and creatively.
– Train your leaders to know their subordinates and their families.

These are principles of leadership development that may justifiably be generalized to business, community work, family life and personal conduct. You can use this short list from my notes to review your own current status as a leader in development — and leaders are ALWAYS in development. If you or your team want to experientially engage with learning and applying these principles for purposes of leadership development, contact me – Tom Delaney – at greatriverfitness@gmail.com. You can access the original copy of ADP 7-0 HERE.