Archive for the ‘Navy’ Category

DO YOU HATE RUNNING? EXERCISE? SO DOES DAVID GOGGINS! (NEW VIDEO)   Leave a comment

Do you hate running and excercise? As much as David Goggins? Check out this recently released video and tips from David Goggins (Navy SEAL) for starting small and staying motivated.

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STEW SMITH (NAVY SEAL) WORKOUTS – MAY 13, 2013   Leave a comment

swimpt1-300x300Here are Stew Smith’s (Navy SEAL) recommended workouts for today. Choose a workout in preparation for your fitness test or goals:

Navy SEAL
500yd Swim
Push-ups 2 min (max)
Sit-ups 2 min (max)
Pull-ups 2 min (max)
1.5 mile Run

AFPJ PAST
500m Swim
1.5 mile Run
Push-ups 2 min (max)
Sit-ups 2 min (max)
Pull-ups 2 min (max)

Army Ranger
Pushups 2 min (max)
Sit-ups 2 min (max)
Pull-up 2 min (max)
5 mile Run

– or –

Upper Body Round Robin

1 minute of pushups (min 40)
1 minute of sit-ups (min 40)
Pull-ups (min 6) not timed
Dips (min 6) not timed
Bench press 80% body weight (min 6) not timed
20 ft rope climb in body armor or weight vest (just 1… pass or fail event)
1 minute kip-ups (min 6) (pullup with a kip)
4 x 25 m shuttle run (max 24 seconds)
5 mile run (max 40 minutes) or 5 mile ruck march (75 min max, 45lbs dry weight)

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #9 – ROBERT NEEDHAM (NAVY SEAL) ON TEAM LEADERSHIP   Leave a comment

Today I would like to continue sharing with you more of my highlights and notes from Team Secrets of the Navy SEALs by Robert Needham (Navy SEAL).

Chapter 1 – Leading the Best (cont.)

1. “If an individual or a Team starts to lose focus, they must step back and review.” — Sometimes individuals or teams feel that they do not have time to step back and refocus. Of course, if you ask if they have more or less time to lose focus, go for a walk in the woods, fail and get miserable, re-focus time doesn’t look as costly as the alternative. That said, I’ve seen people and teams get into “locked up” mode and require a wake-up call to snap out of it.

2. “It is incumbent upon any group that desires true success to set an environment that allows and encourages communication.” I used to pride myself on being a submarine commander when it comes to communication: “If you don’t hear from me, everything is OK.” With time, I have really come to think that all things are possible with good communication. Just the social support provided in communicatin improves the resilience and chances of survival and success of people in tough situations. As I have heard so often said (to me) before: “Communicate, communicate, communicate.”

3. “You must honestly evaluate your own ability and communicate forthrightly about it — for your own good and for that of the Team. If everyone else is unaware of a weak link, they cannot repair it. Unnoticed, the weak link will break, costing money, time, and perhaps even lives.” — Thee’s a strategy called “Fake it ’til you make it!” for self-improvement, which involves acting like the person you want to be in order to become that person. It’s an effective approach. At the same time, trying to “fake out” others by posing or lying about knowledge or ability is misguided and a clear commitment to making disaster happen for self and others. The bigger person on a Team knows to be clear about limits, risks, and look for reality-checks and options from others.

4. “Wat’s important to the SEAL TEAm is important to any team of professionals inbusiness: Stay informed, stay alert, and stay alive.” — Yep!

5. “It is imperative that you stress [to your team] that no issue will be addressed unless the author also includes a viable solution.” — Major General Ronald Bailey (USMC) imposes the same requirement onhis team. You don’t get to complain or bring up a problem without a number of possible solutions. This makes sense if you want to see firsthand descriptions of problems always accompanied by firsthand proposals for solutions. If you’re not there, you really end up counting on the person who is closest to the problem to ascertain a best probable solution. Makes sense!

6. “Challenge yur team to think outside the box, brainstorm, and create. Give them the responsibility and the latitude to be creative.” — Innovation, adaptation and improvement require creativity. It is an invaluable resource asset for any team. Take care of it!

7. “If you can find humor in a bad situation and joke about it, you will have a better chance of salvaging your attitude and coming out on top.” — Humor puts things in perspective, and opens up space for creative thinking and problem-solving. In addition, laughter activates physiological processes that reduce stress and the distracting, demoralizing and fatiguing effects of stress. Use humor like a medicine and a weapon!

I am preparing engaging leadership development modules, including practical exercises, for individuals and teams. If you or your team is interested in engaging with leadership development in a practical and meaningful work session, let me – Tom Delaney – know via e-mail to greatriverfitness@gmail.com. We’ll put it together and make it happen!

DAVID GOGGINS (NAVY SEAL) HITS PULL-UP LIMIT   Leave a comment

This just in from Special Operations Warrior Foundation, reporting on David Goggins’ (Navy SEAL) quest to set a new world record for pull-ups and raise awareness for the SpecialOperations Warrior Foundation:

Endurance athlete and motivational speaker DavidGoggins began his quest to break the Guinness World Record of 4,020 pull-ups in 24 hrs. in the @todayshow studio just after 8 am on Sept. 27th.

After 6 hours and 30 minutes in, David had completed 2011 pullups (halfway to the record). By 9:15 pm, after 13.5 hours David completed pull-up 2588. He had been in considerable pain for hours as a severe bulge burst through the skin of his right wrist. A medical x-ray at 10:30pm confirmed a right extensor polycis complex partial tear. Basically, the tear rendered his thumb and wrist useless and he was no longer able to grip the bar. The pull-up bar David used for the Guinness challenge was poorly designed. David used a totally different bar during the months of training prior to this event. He didn’t realize how poorly constructed it was and what a difference it would make in his attempt. As the bar weakened, he was dealing with a lot of sway, a left to r…ight movement, which worsened as time went on. David’s crew tried to come up with solutions such as bracing the bar on either side to stabilize it, but were unable to do so. This is what caused the most problems as David lost a lot of energy trying to pull up on an unstable bar. He had to tighten his grip considerably because the bar was moving so much, and he believes this is what caused the forearm injury.

The numbers: David did 2,588 pull-ups in 566 TOTAL sets. That’s 4.6 pull-ups PER set.

David did 216 sets on the minute before taking his first break longer than 60 seconds (12:02 pm).

David did 2.9 pull-ups EVERY minute for 15 hours when he officially ended. That’s INCLUDING the 3 hours at the end, when he did ZERO..

David did AT LEAST 6 pull-ups in his first 111 sets.

David got to 1,000 pull-ups in 2 hrs 48 minutes and 2,000 pull-ups in 3 hrs 34 minutes.

Most importantly, David helped raise awareness and thousands of dollars for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation @SOWF, which provides full college scholarships to the children off fallen military warriors, and you can still donate by going to specialops.org or shownoweakness.com.

As David says, “You can fail, as long as you get back up again. I’ve failed plenty of times, but I just keep going. I’m just an ordinary man. I’m David Goggins, a guy who never gives up, who believes that any man or woman can push beyond their own limits with the right combination of will, focus, determination and discipline.”

Mission accomplished.

ROPE COIL & CARRY   Leave a comment

Knot tying is an important skill for everything from outdoor sports and spec ops to moving grandma’s mattress on the roof of your car. One of my personal goals is to revisit and improve my knot tying skills by reviewing the examples in Basic Seamanship, which you can also review HERE. ITS Tactical has been running a very good “Knot of the Week” series for a couple of years and this week’s feature covers how to coil and carry rope for climbing or rappelling.

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #5: “SOMETHING BIGGER THAN MYSELF”   Leave a comment

“I want to serve something bigger than myself,” is a phrase you will hear from people as the reason why they chose a commitment of service to others and to the nation, even when and especially when that choice involves sacrfice and acceptance of personal risk. I heard this phrase from Marines in the Assault Amphibious School Battalion (MCRD – San Diego) as the reason why they chose the Marine Corps. Robert Needham (Navy SEAL) describes commitment to a cause larger than self as a defining characteristic of SEAL Team members. The conception of a cause bigger than myself, and the determination of a conscious resolve to that cause, and the commitment to take direction in my life from that cause, is an important aspect of leadership development.

My experience in working with people has been that this kind of resolve and commitment is often not easy to arrive at. Two obstacles can happen. First, is the personal statement “I don’t believe things like higher causes and things bigger than myself are real.” Second is the personal statement on the other side, “I believe in things like higher causes and things bigger than myself, but I’m not important or cut out for that stuff.”

The first person is a risky person to have on a team because when things are at their absolute worst and only a belief in a higher cause will compel that person to do what they need to do for the team, that person cannot be counted on to come through for the team because they do not feel compelled by the cause. However, I don’t write off people like that. I invite people like that to get an open mind and experiment with the idea that there are higher causes and things bigger than him or her. Try it out and see how it works for you and others. “I don’t believe in something bigger than myself, but if i did, I guess I would …” OK, that’s a start! My experience has been that a lot of people will start out reluctant but will come around after experiencing life with a belief in a higher cause and something bigger than her or him. All of the sudden life has more meaning, and the person has a more noble identity and higher esteem for self and from others. It positively creates an aura and palpable energy around the person! Some people call this process “drinking the kool-aid” in reference to a cult tragedy back in the 70’s…but in this case we’re talking about drinking something that reveals and empowers.

The second person is also risky to have one a team because when things are at their absolute worst and only a belief in a higher cause will compel that person to do what they need to do for the team they will not feel they are the “chosen one” or up to the job. Like the first person, I don’t write off these people either. The problem is that this person has a preconceived notion about what a champion or hero looks like and has decided they don’t fit the bill, or grew up with people telling her or him that they don’t have the stuff of courage and heroism in them. This is of course negative self-talk and literally not true anyway. Peruse photos and biographies of heroes and you’ll see that they come in all shapes, sizes, races, backgrounds, etc. There are the big and burly classic looking heroes, and there are just as many wiry looking bad asses out there as well. Body type, gender, race — none of that selects the solid teammate or hero. Fateful matches between hard circumstance and even harder personal commitment makes heroism happen. Right away I think of Dick Couch writing how it isn’t the big burly guys who make it through BUD/S reliably. Watch the true story of Carl Brashear in the film Men of Honor, an African-American who rose out of poverty and racism to become a hero. Look at photos and read about the Night Witches of the 46th Taman Guards Night Bomber Aviation Regiment who flew decrepit biplanes against the German Army in World War II. There are many examples and it all goes to show that there is no formulaic hero or champion — it’s only about personal commitment and the brains to follow through on it. So to any person who thinks they’re too small for something bigger than him or herself, I invite that type of person to start dismantling their preconceived notions of what the higher cause and the hero looks like. They need to start looking into the mirror and considering the possibility that there’s a champion and a hero looking back at them, if they just commit to it being so.

OK, so that’s plenty of advice on how to work with people in either of those two circumstances. Where did it come from? It comes from my own personal experience of having been both of those people. Days when I didn’t have time for higher causes and things bigger than myself. Days when I thought “I’m too skinny” and then days when I thought “I’m too fat” to be of any use to a higher cause. Been there, done that. Worked through it all and now I stand on the other end and can give anyone the facts. All of this is to say that the best advice for others is once again usually the best advice for myself as well, and to never lose track of that. I can’t just state an example for others to follow, I gotta live it.

If you or your team want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with this aspect of leadership development, let me – Tom Delaney – know by sending an e-mail to greatriverfitness@gmail.com, and I will be able to share with you workshop formats and complete a planning process with you. We’ll make it happen!

Tran hard, never quit, live well!

Tom Delaney

LEADERSHIP IN THE LEANING REST #4 – ROBERT NEEDHAM (NAVY SEAL) BOOK NOTES   Leave a comment

Today I would like to share with you more of my highlights and notes from Team Secrets of the Navy SEALs by Robert Needham (Navy SEAL). I finished this book last night and have to say that amongst all the flotsam and jetsam of leadership literature, this little $6 book was a real treasure to find! Best book on leadership and organizational theory I have ever read — and I’m a guy who has dropped a lot of money on leadership courses. In hsraing these notes with you, I hope to share some of the wisdom and save you a lot of wasted effort and money as well! Here goes…

Chapter 1 – Leading the Best (cont.)

“Never underestimate the value of a fresh , innovative and perhaps even abstract point of view. Diversity is good and can strengthen the Team.” — A team with no diversity has less potential ability for adaptation when the inevitable challenges arise. In addition, I read this and thought of the value of keeping my own thinking fresh, innovative and abstract. It helps me stay mentally strong and adaptive. Yeah, I am a guy who reads a lot of “weird stuff” all the time and maintains a lot of interests in arts, cultures, history and literature. Because of this, I am able to look at situations and problems from multiple perspectives, assess multiple risks, and come up with multiple possible solutions. I also just get a lot more out of life.

“Even in failure, a tight Team can learn, adapt, train, and get itself back in the fight.” — It’s never how many times I or my team gets knocked down, it’s about how many times we I get back up. What separates a team that can get back i the fight from one that is down for the count is the ability of that team to learn. As long as I and my team are learning, we’re still in the fight. In addition, there’s value in mistakes as learning opportunities. I humorously remember watching Don Shipley (Navy SEAL) remark on one occasion “You don’t learn shit without failure” — he’s right! As many failures as I have had in my life, I am happy to say I learned a lot from them! I’m a pretty smart guy! 😉

“You are expected, as are the rest of the [Team] members, to be of the highest caliber. Hold yourself to these standards as you would anyone else…no excuses.” — High standards is a lifestyle choice. I either choose high standards or I don’t. In my view, the choice is not dependent on wealth, brains, convenience or anything like that. Anyone is capable of adopting high standards without those things. Adopting high standards depends upon me recognizing my own potential to meet high standards, and the fact that the world needs me to do so. I am expected to adopt high standards by those who depend upon me — my family especially, but also my co-workers and my community. I make the choice, and because I see the potential in others, and because I see the world needs people with high standards in order for things like justice and prosperity to happen, I do expect high standards from others.

“Each block or phase will follow the same basic pattern: Learn, apply, review, evaluate, reapply, reevaluate, and then set SOP’s (standard operating procedures).” — A defined process for learning. Needham also emphasizes the value of documenting and frequently reviewing “lessons learned” in a notebook or electronic file.

“When you are planning a mission or a roadmap to complete an assigned task, set points along the way to realign and refocus your efforts. Bring the Team together and ensure that you are indeed headed in the correct direction…periodic checkpoints will ensure you’re on track.” — Land navigation and orienteering is a very concrete way to learn and practice this principle. It is not enough for me to set a course for a destination at the outset based on the limited information I have. I need to set checkpoints to ensure that I establish and maintain a course toward my destination that minimizes risk to acceptable levels. Project management and life itself functions the same way. Get your map, get your compass, AND be prepared to adjust and adapt!

I am preparing engaging leadership development modules, including practical exercises, for individuals and teams. If you or your team is interested in engaging with leadership development in a practical and meaningful work session, let me – Tom Delaney – know via e-mail to greatriverfitness@gmail.com. We’ll put it together and make it happen!